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TSA Minneapolis emplyee: "Full body scanners are 10,000 safer than cell-phones"

Dear friends,

The best way to end the use of these scanners, is to avoid flying.

Peace,

Arlene Johnson
Publisher/Author
http://www.truedemocracy.net
To access my work, click on the icon that says Magazine.
To comment or ask questions, please send to a@truedemocracy.net

TSA Minneapolis employee: “Full body scanners are 10,000 safer than cell-phones”
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Alfred Lambremont Webre, Seattle Exopolitics Examiner
September 8, 2011 - Like this? Subscribe to get instant updates.


By Alfred Lambremont Webre, JD, Med
At 5:30 AM CDT on the morning of September 8, 2011 this reporter entered Minneapolis-St. Paul airport to board a flight to Seattle, returning from an Exopolitics reporting assignment in Minneapolis.
All was routine until I approached the TSA security search area.
At that point I was requested to remove my tube of Tom’s toothpaste from my kit in my carryon.

Toothpaste is a liquid

“What!” I exclaimed to the femaie TSA attendant. “I am a frequent flyer and never have I had to remove my toothpaste tube from my carryon.  I want to talk to your supervisor.”

The female TSA attendant called over a heavy-set man in a TSA uniform. 
“Yes,” he said.  “Every other airport is doing it wrong. You have to remove your toothpaste tube.”

He later handed me 3 pages of printed TSA regulations.  “All liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in a single, quart-sized plastic bag,” he read. “Toothpaste is a liquid.”

Full body scanner is “10,000 safer than cellphones”
I relented, and turned back into the TSA security line only to be confronted by a TSA full body scanner.

The only TSA full body scanner I had allowed my self to go through was returning from Buenos Aires, Argentina via the Dallas, Texas airport in Nov. 2010, before I had read any literature on their detrimental health effects.  I remembered feeling nauseous during and after the traumatic experience and vowing never to use one again.

So I said, “I am not going to go into that scanner thing.”

The TSA scanner attendant shouted out something like “A Refuser” and I was directed to gather my luggage and go to a special mat with footprints on it.
An African American TSA body searcher approached me and said, “I’m only doing my job.”

As he was physically body-searching me (including my upper inner thigh areas), I said, “The reason I refuse to go through the full body scanner is that it causes cancer.”

The African American TSA body searcher then says to me, “You use a cell phone?  This thing is 10,000 times safer than a cell phone!”

I knew I was a virtual prisoner.  The TSA body searcher’s hand was on my thigh.  I was in the Minneapolis Airport TSA facility that even now is the subject of lawsuits by prominent citizens, including a former Governor of Minnesota.

I kept my silence, and determined to report this outrageous and negligent lack of awareness and misinformation being passed on to citizens by the TSA.
Here is the evidence that the full body scanners are detrimentally affecting even TSA scanner operator’s health and TSA is engaged in a coverup.

Remember the motto of the early AIDS awareness movement: SILENCE = DEATH!!
Cancer Surges In Body Scanner Operators; TSA Launches Cover-Up


by Paul Joseph Watson
Copyright Infowars.com

June 28, 2011

"Fearful of provoking further public resistance to naked airport body scanners, the TSA has been caught covering up a surge in cases of TSA workers developing cancer as a result of their close proximity to radiation-firing devices, perhaps the most shocking revelation to emerge from the latest FOIA documents obtained by the Electronic Privacy Information Center.
 "After Union representatives in Boston discovered a “cancer cluster” amongst TSA workers linked with radiation from the body scanners, the TSA sought to downplay the matter and refused to issue employees with dosimeters to measure levels of exposure.

The documents indicate how, 'A large number of workers have been falling victim to cancer, strokes and heart disease.'

"'The Department, rather than acting on it, or explaining its position seems to have just dismissed. I don’t think that’s the way most other agencies would have acted in a similar situation if they were confronted with that question,' EPIC’s Marc Rotenberg said.

"In an email sent to Heather Callahan (PDF), deputy federal security director at Boston Logan International Airport, union representatives express their concern about 'TSA Boston’s growing number of TSOs working here that have thus far been diagnosed with cancer.'

"Of course, if TSA workers who are merely standing near the scanners are already developing cancer, frequent flyers are also putting themselves in harm’s way by standing directly inside the radiation-firing machines.
"As we reported yesterday, newly released internal government documents, obtained via the Freedom Of Information Act by the Electronic Privacy Information Center, reveal that the TSA, and specifically the head of the Department of Homeland Security, “publicly mischaracterized” the findings of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, in stating that NIST had positively confirmed the safety of full body scanners in tests.
"In erroneously citing both NIST and the Johns Hopkins school of medicine to claim that the body scanners are safe, the TSA has also deliberately misled the public on the dangers posed by the devices.

"Documents obtained by EPIC show that, far from affirming their safety, NIST warned that airport screeners should avoid standing next to full body scanners in order to keep exposure to harmful radiation “as low as reasonably achievable.”

"Further documents illustrate how a Johns Hopkins study actually revealed that radiation zones around body scanners could exceed the “General Public Dose Limit,” contradicting repeated claims by the TSA that Johns Hopkins had validated the safety of the devices.

"At the time we pointed out that Dr Michael Love, who runs an X-ray lab at the department of biophysics and biophysical chemistry at the Johns Hopkins school of medicine had publicly stated two days previously that “statistically someone is going to get skin cancer from these X-rays”.
"TSA workers complained about the radiation dangers of the scanners back in December, saying they were being kept in the dark by their employers, despite repeated requests for information.

"'We don’t think the agency is sharing enough information,”'said Milly Rodriguez, occupational health and safety specialist at the American Federation of Government Employees, the union that represents TSA workers.
"A study conducted last year by Dr David Brenner, head of Columbia University’s center for radiological research, found that the body scanners are likely to lead to an increase in a common type of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma, which affects the head and neck.

"Following the study, Brenner urged medical authorities to look at his work, pointing to the dangerous notion of mass scanning millions of people without proper oversight.

"'There really is no other technology around where we’re planning to X-ray such an enormous number of individuals. It’s really unprecedented in the radiation world,' said Brenner.

"Similar concerns to those explored in the Columbia University study were voiced in February 2010 by the influential Inter-Agency Committee on Radiation Safety, who warned in a report that the scanners increase the risk of cancer and birth defects and should not be used on pregnant women or children.

"Despite governments claiming that backscatter x-ray systems produce radiation too low to pose a threat, the organization concluded in their report that governments must justify the use of the scanners and that a more accurate assessment of the health risks is needed.

"Pregnant women and children should not be subject to scanning, according to the report, adding that governments should consider “other techniques to achieve the same end without the use of ionizing radiation.”

"'The Committee cited the IAEA’s 1996 Basic Safety Standards agreement, drafted over three decades, that protects people from radiation. Frequent exposure to low doses of radiation can lead to cancer and birth defects, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,' reported Bloomberg.
"In a recent letter to President Obama’s Science Advisor, several University of California professors also complained of how, 'There is still no rigorous, hard, data for the safety of x-ray airport passenger scanners.' The scientists noted how the safety tests for the scanners were carried out exclusively by manufacturers, and recommended an immediate moratorium on use of the devices until the health risks can be independently studied."

Copyright Inforwars.com
Written and posted at SEATAC airport
10:30 AM, Sept, 8, 2011
_____________________
COPYRIGHT: Permission to use extracts & copyright notice
Copyright Alfred Lambremont Webre JD, MEd, All right reserved
Permission is granted to include extracts of this article on websites and email lists provided a link is included to the original article.
This article is copyrighted and should not be added in its entirety on other websites or email lists without author's written permission. For permission please contact: exopolitics@exopolitics.com. Thank you.
Tags: airports/scanners/radiation/cancer
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